Sartor Resartus (1831); Lectures on Heroes (1840).




Creator

Date

1858

Identifier

Truby King Collection PR 4429 A1 1858

Publisher

London: Chapman and Hall

Abstract

When Dickens and Thomas Carlyle met in 1840, it was the beginning of a life-long friendship. The gruff Scot held a contrary opinion on Dickens, the so-called ‘entertainer’: ‘Dickens had not written anything which would be found of much use in solving the problems of life.’ After Dickens’s death, Carlyle proclaimed: ‘the good, the gentle, ever noble Dickens, - every inch of him an Honest Man!’ Dickens claimed to have read the essayist’s The French Revolution 500 times, and used it as a basis for his own A Tale of Two Cities. This copy was once Truby King’s and is annotated by him.

[Page 304-305 from Thomas Carlyle's Sartor Resartus (1831); Lectures on Heroes (1840).]

Files

Cabinet 1 Carlyle jpeg.jpg

Citation

Thomas Carlyle, “Sartor Resartus (1831); Lectures on Heroes (1840).,” ourheritage.ac.nz | OUR Heritage, accessed February 28, 2024, https://ourheritage.ac.nz/items/show/7115.